When do Termites Become a Problem
  • May 21, 2019
When Do Termites Become A Problem?

Termites become a problem whenever they infest your home and no measures are taken to remove and eliminate the colony or colonies. This becomes a problem because flying termites and subterranean termites have a voracious appetite that keeps the feeding cycle going around the clock. That means every hour could mean more damage to your property. To keep the termite colonies active, during the swarming season, which usually takes place during the spring, male and female termites are tasked with developing new colonies where soldier and worker termites keep the colony protected, intact and thriving.

As a property owner, being proactive in controlling and eliminating termites can help avoid potential and expensive damages to the structure. Getting an inspection by a professional engineer to determine structural damage, scheduling an inspection by a professional pest control service, and securing a termite bond to cover treatment for the property are steps you can take whether signs are present of an infestation is suspected. 

Termite Infestation Signs to Look For

When termites have invaded your home, you may not know it immediately but signs of termites are visible if you look closely. Signs to look for include:

  • Blistered flooring - if wood flooring has areas that are similar to a blister, this is a sign that termites may be feeding.
  • Evidence of swarms - When termites are swarming, it's for a specific reason, which is to mate. You may find discarded wings near points of entry such as doors and windows. When the swarming is complete, the termites start another cycle by setting up a new colony. 
  • Mud tubes - evidence of tunnels on exterior walls or foundation is another sign of termites. These wood-eating culprits are the subterranean termite species. These pests nest underground and eat their way upward inflicting damage to wood along the way. The mud tubes they create are small cylinder-type tubes found wherever a viable food source is nearby. The tubes are created by the termites who use the tunnels as a means of transporting food. The tunnels also help regulate the internal temperature, which makes their nesting area a suitable living environment. 
  • Damaged or hollow wood - The wood may have the appearance of burrows or hollowed out areas running through the wood due to chewing by the termites. The burrows weaken the wood, which in time can lead to significant structural damage to floors and support beams. You may also see signs of damage in wood furniture and wood framing around doors and windows.
  • Drywood termite frass - termite poop is referred to as frass. The excrement is created by the termites eating the wood. Naturally, the termite poop is composed of wood. Drywood termites do not use the frass. Instead, they create holes where they can remove the excrement, which keeps the living area clean. The termite pellets present themselves as powdery-looking mounds of granules. When these mounds are present, which may be around entry points, it is an indication drywood termites are in residence.

Contact Clint Miller Exterminating

When you see signs of termites, it's time to call in the technicians for a free no obligation termite inspection. An inspection is the first step towards securing the structural integrity of your home. While there are steps you can take to eliminate creating a welcoming environment for termites, only the professional and experienced staff at Clint Miller Exterminating know how to get rid of termites.

Schedule a free inspection for a technician to thoroughly check your property, determine the level of infestation, discuss treatment options, then map out a plan of action. Call at your earliest convenience or fill out the online request form and get the help needed to eliminate termites and prevent additional damage to your home or business. 

 

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